Results 1 to 31 of 31
  1. #1
    Just a quick question... how are the prices on glass in venice? I was telling a friend that I wanted to get some beautiful venetian glass things to bring back, and she joked that they always have it on sale at TJMaxx.. sad but true..

    I would like to bring something wonderful back.. for those who have purchased glass things.. may I ask a price range?

  2. #2
    Just a quick question... how are the prices on glass in venice? I was telling a friend that I wanted to get some beautiful venetian glass things to bring back, and she joked that they always have it on sale at TJMaxx.. sad but true..

    I would like to bring something wonderful back.. for those who have purchased glass things.. may I ask a price range?

  3. #3

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    falmouth , MA USA
    Posts
    430
    I guess it depends on exactly what you are looking for. I would avoid the high pressure "free" tours that leave from Venice. We saw chandileers that were as high as $50,000
    and correspondingly high prices on vases etc. I have no ability to discern the value of such things but in general, the further away from the tourit oriented factory showrooms, the better the prices. You can purchase a small object for 5-10 euro and then up to the sky.Also beware that some of the really cheap items may actually be coming from China.

  4. #4
    You might find pieces less expensive at TJ Max, however it is WHERE I buy a piece that attaches the worth of it. Larger pieces are easily over 100 euro - but again it will depend on the quality and details.

  5. #5
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Beautiful San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    16,402
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">always have it on sale at TJMaxx.. sad but true.. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>The stuff at TJMaxx are fakes from China. Rather: real glass, fake Murano glass. You'll see fakes in Italy, too. If you find long glass bead necklaces, earrings, etc., for around €10 - beware that they are not Murano (Venetian) glass.

    Prices of the real thing will range from "reasonable" to "very expensive." In my experience, the closer you are to Piazza San Marco the higher the prices. I have two favorite shops for unique jewelry in Venice, both in San Polo. I will look up addresses if you're interested.

    I haven't bought anything but jewelry in years, but will tell you that the small fazzoletto (handkerchief) vase I bought in Murano in 1996 cost the equivalent of $60. Last year earrings I liked were around €20 and necklaces (with just a few beads) €35-45.

    The best advice I can give you for shopping in Venice is: if you fall in love with something, buy it. You may not have time to return to the shop - or even find it again!

  6. #6
    well.. what I'm think of, would be small items... I have a beautiful shelf at home that I would like to add some glasswear to.. and it has a clearance of about 8".. so, most of the pieces I would buy would have to be pretty small.. plus, I'd like to bring back some small souvineers for friends and family.. and the $10-20 euro range would be perfect for that..

  7. #7
    You will be absolutely overwhelmed by the choice of glassware in your price-range all over Venice!

    My last visit to Venice was last December and the shops were showcasing all kinds of Christmassy themed glass gifts as well as every other type of glass ornament imaginable. I purchased a set of six little shot glasses for 5 euro each.

  8. #8
    oh my.. I didn't even think about ornaments!! my whole tree is decorated in crystal/glass... oh no.. I should warn my husband ahead of time.. I bet I go crazy buying ornaments!!!!

  9. #9


    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    mahwah, new jersey, usa
    Posts
    4,398
    I bought eight champagne flutes from a shop on Murano in 2001, while Italy was still using Lira.

    They were made to order and shipped to me in the US about a month later, the total bill including shipping was around $450, or about $56 per stem.
    ellen

  10. #10


    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Mountain Lakes, NJ USA
    Posts
    604
    Colleen...if it isn't too much trouble, what are your two favorite glass shops in San Polo?

  11. #11
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Newport, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    646
    My two favorite glass shops in Venice are Genninger (right at the Ca Rezzonicco vaporetto stop) www.genningerstudio.com & I'isola the showroom of Carlo Moretti (at Campo San Moise, San Marco) www.carlomoretti.com

    Good venetian glass is not cheap and some of the 'art' pieces are terrifyingly expensive, but there are lovely small pieces that won't break the bank (although with the way the Aussie $ is against the euro at the moment, a coffee is looking expensive!)

    I absolutely agree that if you see something and love it - buy it. If you do want to go away and think about something make sure you not only write down the name and address of the shop, but also the name of the 2 nearest large calles and any nearby landmarks so you can find it again - can't tell you how many times I've gone away to think about something and then never been able to find the shop again!

    All of the good glass shops are expert at both packing (Carlo Moretti had cut to size foam packing on hand for each piece we bought) and, if required,shipping.

  12. #12
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Newton (outside Boston), MA
    Posts
    11,695
    We have two excellent travel notes on shopping in Venice with suggestions on the main site, here. (scroll down)
    Amy in MA
    Destination Anywhere

    "A traveler without knowledge is a bird without wings."--Sa'di, Gulistan (1258)

  13. #13


    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,157
    Speaking of fake pieces--don't the real pieces, such as a vase, have a stamp on the bottom? I thought I read that somewhere.
    I can't read mine, they are small pieces, but there is something there. One piece has a signature on the bottom.

  14. #14


    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Venezia, Italia
    Posts
    3,365
    The most important thing is to get informed about the glass you're considering buying. Make the museum on Murano one of your first stops. You can get to know the evolution, the various techniques, and view works by some of the most famous masters and designers without anyone trying to sell to you.

    I might also consider buying Michela Scibilia's guide to Murano (available at any bookshop here), which includes a broad discussion on glass but is a guide to the island of Murano as well, with recommendations for various studios and furnaces and retail shops. There are other, less-expensive guides, many of which are listed (along with a great overview) in Durant Imboden's article, here.

    One of my favorite studios on Murano is Venini on the Fondamenta Vetrai. I could sit in there for hours and just absorb the surrounding works. They are splendid...and having prices that reflect it.

    Also, best not to consider taking a "free" taxi to Murano offered by your hotel. If you get to the island, though, make sure to include a visit to the ancient San Donato church with its marvelous mosaics.

  15. #15
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Beautiful San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    16,402
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Bailey:
    Colleen...if it isn't too much trouble, what are your two favorite glass shops in San Polo? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Better late than never? I searched through old threads looking for this information for Sharon L, and realized I'd never posted it.

    *Dona Maria Luisa has a shop with a wonderful variety of lovely jewelry at 2738 Calle dei Saoneri in San Polo, near Campo San Polo, telephone: 5222884. She also carries Murano glassware, vases, and other miscellaneous Venetian souvenirs. Maria Luisa is very friendly and helpful - you'll be happy you shopped with her!

    *Cannot find the card for the lovely Valentina Bijouterie, but have attached a photo of the front window. This tiny shop is just up Calle dei Saoneri from the other, heading away from Rialto towards Dorsoduro. Valentina is a sweet young woman (pictured in the peach top), with a beautiful sense of design. In 2007 I bought an asymmetrical greeny-gold beaded necklace that I love wearing, and its unique style always draws compliments.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails valentina.JPG  

  16. #16
    Just for fun I would like to add that my fiance and I purchased matching Murano glass pendants at a Costco traveling road show in Canada this Spring. I know the company was visiting several Costco locations throughout America. We get compliments whenever we wear them. I was in Venice last year so it has a special magic for me. The pendants were $30 Canadian.
    Sandy

    Sandy

  17. #17


    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,072
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Colleen:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Bailey:
    Colleen...if it isn't too much trouble, what are your two favorite glass shops in San Polo? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Better late than never? I searched through old threads looking for this information for Sharon L, and realized I'd never posted it.

    *Dona Maria Luisa has a shop with a wonderful variety of lovely jewelry at 2738 Calle dei Saoneri in San Polo, near Campo San Polo, telephone: 5222884. She also carries Murano glassware, vases, and other miscellaneous Venetian souvenirs. Maria Luisa is very friendly and helpful - you'll be happy you shopped with her!

    </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    My daughter, Sarah, and I have bought many things for ourelves and as gifts from Dona Maria Luisa. She is not only firendly and helpful, she speaks excellent English and usually gives a small discount if you pay in cash. Her shop is just over hte San Polo Bridge as you walk from Campo San Polo towards Campo San Toma. Further down the Calle - away from Campo San Polo and towards San Toma - are three other small shops. Il Picolo Bazar and Top One. Both have tons of typical tourist items, but if you have the patience to poke around, there are also some lovely pieces. Mauro who owns Il Picolo Bazar also speaks good English and is extremely friendly and helpful. On the left side of the calle, right near Trattoria Da Ignazio is a tiny shop called I Vetri di Lume di Amadi, # 2747, telephone 041-523-8089. He sits in his shop making amazingly life like figures of birds, animals, insects, flowers, fruit, and vegetables. It is worth stopping in just to peek at the glass case he has on one wall with "not for sale" glass horses that are so delicate and lovely it is hard to believe they were made by a mere mortal.
    His prices vary with the amount of work that goes into each item, but they are nothing like the mass producedstuff you see elsewhere. There used to be a place near the Church of San Zaccaria that sold glassware made to look like old Roman glass as well as hand made/blown more modern pieces and jewelery but I am not sure if it is still there. Ruth

  18. #18
    You know you don't always get what you pay for. I have seen some wonderful things worth every penny and some total trash totally over priced. I have also discovered that sometimes you can get just as good a price at home. Unless you have no idea of what your going to buy (I have done that as well to <G>) you might want to price at home because sometimes its a lot easier to buy at home than to ship and carry around with you for the slight savings and you don't have the worry about breaking it - also been there done that. Its a toss up between "I bought that in Venice" or I saw that in Venice and purchased it at home. Whatever you choose remember to check your prices. There are many many wonderful glass establishments in Venice.

  19. #19
    I work with Murano, I was there a week ago.
    Something is changing now. There are many glass makers who are tired of the old system of selling, where they would give to a "sala" and let them sell for 5 to 10 times its cost.
    True makers have their own store are Venini, Carlo Moretti and so on. There you would buy at the same price that you will find everywhere in the world.
    There is not a true maker small artisan that sells directly but shortly there would be if nothing changes with the economy, or there would not be one in the future. Of the 10 glass makers we visited, only one was open, and he was open because he was closed the previous 3 months.
    Venini is closed. It's a disaster.
    I agree with all who are saying not to take the free taxi. But where to go to see true makers that are not an international firm. There is an new generation of artists now using their own shop. Schiavon, Salvatore. Others are so tired of Venice that they don't show there, Tagliapietra, Afro etc.

  20. #20
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Quincy, MA, USA
    Posts
    4,409
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">my fiance and I </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Sandy, this is wonderful news! congratulations I'm so happy for you!!

    Pokey

  21. #21


    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    San Francisco/Venezia for the holidays
    Posts
    1,800
    This is our favorite bead shop. I am not a shopper but when I need to buy murano glass I come here.

    We met the owners, Theresa and Michelangelo during our Christmas 2007 holiday in Venice while staying across from the Scala del Bovolo in the San Marco area. Theresa is american while Michelangelo is venetian. Michelangelo is Loris' brother, that is Loris at Ciak's bar/cafe.




    Simply travel, travel simply.



  22. #22
    Thanks Pokey! I have found out that there is happiness after the death of a loved one.

    Sandy
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Photo_155.jpg  

  23. #23
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Beautiful San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    16,402
    Great news, Sandy! I'm so happy for you - Congratulations!

    I was hoping for a picture ... thanks! My curiosity about what his and her glass pendants would look like was killing me.

  24. #24
    Hi

    I will remember to upload a photo of our glass pendants. Thanks for reminding me.

    Sandy

  25. #25
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    7,881
    Sandy,
    I congratulate the handsome man in your photo.
    In France, I was told never to congratulate the lady, but always to congratulate the gentleman, for being such a lucky guy…


    In Venice I like to wade through the Anticlea Antiquariato (Calle San Provolo 4719a, Castello), very near my fave scarf-shawl shop Barbieri) for vintage Venetian glass jewelry
    [URL=http://www.paris-update.com/fr/hot-topics/cest-ironique/22268-yet-more-paris-shop-signs-from-the-ridiculous-to-the-sublimely-ridiculous-part-11]"…as Ernest Hemingway said in the first draft of his memoir, ‘Paris is an unimprovable feast of idiot

  26. #26
    Here are our matching Murano glass pendants for our engagement. I absolutely love the green color.

    Sandy
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Photo_17.jpg  

  27. #27
    Premium Member
    Moderator

    Slow Traveler
    teaberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Posts
    10,564
    Sandy, you both look very happy together. Let me extend my congratulations to you, too. I really love the glass pendant idea.

  28. #28
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    3,797
    Sandy what wonderful news-Congratulations!!
    What a handsome couple and the engagement glass pendants are so beautiful. Salute.

  29. #29
    I bought a small fragile plain perfume vase for $10 and a heavy murano rose vase for around $25, and that was back in 1978! I agree, if you really want something you see and can afford it, go for it...otherwise don't count on buying glass. I remember my Italian friend and I visiting the glass blowers on the island of Murano on our own back in 1978. It was close to siesta and the place was deserted except for us young women. The young, very Italian sales agent took us from one fantastic showroom to another; switching the lights on and off from room to room to save energy. Soon, he started to pinch my friend and she protested in Italian, eventually slapping him. We started literally running from lightened room to darkened rooms along the way faster and faster, like a keystone cop episode. Finally, we burst out to where the actual glass blowing was occuring to the laughter of the glass blowers who apparently knew the pattern. That was our last solo tour of our visit to Venice.

  30. #30
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Always Italy:
    Speaking of fake pieces--don't the real pieces, such as a vase, have a stamp on the bottom? I thought I read that somewhere.
    I can't read mine, they are small pieces, but there is something there. One piece has a signature on the bottom. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    The only certain proof that a glass product was made in Murano is a seal of Consorzio Promovetro that is usually printed on the attached certificate of authenticity rather than imprinted on the product itself. The seal shows Murano artisan's tools in the shape of disk and twizzers and says "Vetro Artistico Murano". Also the stores that sell authentic Murano glass in Venice often feature this sign in the windows. You can see the mark and more info on Promovetro here: http://www.promovetro.com/port...tuzionale.php?id=370

    Promovetro is the only official consortium of authentic Murano Glass makers. It is located in Venice and aims to preserve the authentic Murano glassmaking techniques and traditions and fights against all the counterfeits produced in China and elsewhere. Only the firms that are located on Murano and follow ancient techniques of glass blowing can be certified by promovetro and allowed to carry the official sign of the Consortium on their products.

    Hope this will help as you shop for Murano glass both in Venice and online.

  31. #31
    Hi

    We just got back last week from Santorini and actually purchased matching Murano pendants for our wedding day!

    Sandy

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •