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  1. #1
    We're traveling to Italy next year and will be renting a villa during the last week in April. We seem to be leaning toward Lucca area or north. My wife despises bugs - especially skeeters. Unfortunately most of the rentals do not have bug screens which is really reducing our choices of places to rent.

    Anyone have any experience with these critters during that time of the year? If we find a place without screens are there options you would suggest. My wife argues that sprays are smelly and toxic; mosquito curtain on the beds - maybe. How about temporary screens?

    Any advise or help would be appreciated. My wife doesn't want to feel like she is on a safari.

    Gary

  2. #2
    We're traveling to Italy next year and will be renting a villa during the last week in April. We seem to be leaning toward Lucca area or north. My wife despises bugs - especially skeeters. Unfortunately most of the rentals do not have bug screens which is really reducing our choices of places to rent.

    Anyone have any experience with these critters during that time of the year? If we find a place without screens are there options you would suggest. My wife argues that sprays are smelly and toxic; mosquito curtain on the beds - maybe. How about temporary screens?

    Any advise or help would be appreciated. My wife doesn't want to feel like she is on a safari.

    Gary

  3. #3


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    "Safari" would be a stretch here in Italy, but I can tell you that in April mosquitos are not a major issue. I say find a place you really like and go for it. Chances are no one will suffer a bite.

    By the way, citrus candles can help the situation, smeel lovely to good and dinner/drinks by candlelight is always romantic...

  4. #4

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    Any mosquitoes in November (from Naples to Venice)?

  5. #5
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    Mosquitos (or zanzari) in Tuscany are very common and active from late Spring to early fall--particularly during the summer hot months. Stores there have 1000's (at least) of sprays, plug-ins, citronella products, etc. to ward them off. Many of them work quite well with the sprays and lotions not strongly scented. April and November are pretty safe months--or so we found in Tuscany.

  6. #6


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    Please check some climatic data for Italy.
    Italy is not a tropical country, it is a country with temperate climate. Mosquito occur during the warm summer months and then only in certain areas, generally lowlands or urban areas where still water is somewhat close to houses.

    The fact the many rentals do not have screen demonstrate that there is no need for screens, and certainly in November and April all mosquitoes are asleep!

  7. #7


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    hello,
    you could always buy those fold-out antibug screens/tents that fit on top of the bed... not exactly romantic, but practical.

  8. #8


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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Any mosquitoes in November (from Naples to Venice)? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Last Feb in Sorrento we opened the patio door at night. We got 4 mosquitoes in the room one night. We were on the ground floor. I have wondered if there are fewer mosquitoes the further you go up (higher stories). In Dec in Rome I did not see any mosquitoes and we were on the third floor. At the beginning of April in Rome we were on the sixth floor and opened the windows at night and there were no mosquitoes.

    There was a previous thread about mosquitoes but it was about July. I believe thatg there have been other screen threads.
    http://slowtalk.com/groupee/forums/a/tpc/f/862600685/m/...061030023#9061030023
    It is basically a cultural thing that Italians don't have screens on the windows. if questioned about this they bring up the screens obsuring the view, the cost of screens (even new construction in Italy, they doesn't put screen on the window), and that there really no bugs of note (no flies either) to keep out of the house (in Venere reviews of Venice hotels without air conditioning tourists mention the mosquitoes from the canals during the summer months). Whatever.

    The fact is that there no screens and if the bugs bother you, you need to work out a mechanical or chemical (repellants) way to cope with this during your visit just in case.

  9. #9


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    In the Veneto, Tuscany, Umbria and northern ("Altissimo") Lazio, we've never had a problem with zanzari or felt the need for screens--always travelling in November or March, though. We recently added the pull-down screens in our apartment in Casparia, but more so potential renters know they are there than due to any real, felt need. We were there in late July/early August and didn't use them much.
    Chris Phillips
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  10. #10
    We were in Florence in late October and we were on the fourth floor of the hotel, and it was warm enough to sleep with the window open.

    Mosquitoes the size of pigeons swarmed our room (OK, an exaggeration), but they were voracious.

    The next day we went to a little hardware-like store, and bought a small can of repellant (under 2), which was very effective.

    Mosquitoes can be a problem, but it is a problem that was easy to handle.

  11. #11


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    I have been to several places in Northern and Central Italy in May and October and only had problems last October in Florence. I was told that it was a particularly bad year for mosquitoes. I was happy that I had AC and could keep the windows closed. ---Marlene

  12. #12

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    I'm just a little north of Tuscany and I don't recall these bugs being a problem in April. In fact, around here they seem to be at their worst in August (of course it doesn't help we live next to a river).

    We have a little "oven" that we plug into the wall. There is a little paper pill that you place on top and as it heats it releases an "anti mosquito" smell. It works like a charm and always keeps them out of our bedroom. The best part is that it doesn't smell bad at all and it lasts for 12 hours. I'm not sure what these little ovens are really called, but maybe someone else reading this will know.

    Best of luck!
    Cyn

  13. #13
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    You have two choices....physical barriers and chemical barriers.

    Unless you cover your body in DEET, chemical barriers don't work (and DEET is thought by many to cause cancer, so pick your poison). You can buy candles, oils, soaps, vaporizers, and sprays....it will make your room smell nice and you will still get bitten.

    Physical barriers consist of windows, screens, mosquito nets, and clothes that cover your body.

    I've hiked and climbed in areas that swarmed with mosquitoes and have survived. However, the two places that I have give up and surrendered to the inevitability of being bitten are Boston (North Shore area, specifically) and Italy.

    Take along some good topical ointments and enjoy yourself.

  14. #14

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    For Greasyregs, we are talking about ** APRIL ** There will be no skeeters.

    For Scott, we are talking about ** NOVEMBER **. There will be no skeeters.

  15. #15


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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">surrendered to the inevitability of being bitten are Boston (North Shore area, specifically) and Italy. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    For some people being bitten by a mosquito is more than jsut a minor annoyance. Both my younger daughter and I swell when bitten by mosquitoes. More than once both my daughter and I were bitten by mosquitoes as we slept on our face and had our face swell up so that one eye was swollen shut. We look like Frankenstein. Granted, with Benadryl in a few days the swelling goes down and we don't have scars, but this is more than jsut a minor annoyance. DEET is my friend, and there are more than a few lawn treatments, food additives and medicines than "might" cause cancer if one has a large enough or prolonged enough exposure. if you sleep under the covers, usually you need DEET only on you face, arms, and upper torso.

  16. #16
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">we are talking about ** APRIL ** There will be no skeeters.

    we are talking about ** NOVEMBER **. There will be no skeeters. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I believe these little fiends begin hatching at around 65 degrees F. The mean temperatures in Italy in April and November are right on the cusp of this temperature, so would not want to bet that there won't be any around. I have seen mosquitoes on the sides of a glacier when I was dressed in about 5 layers of clothing, so also not sure how accurate the 65 degrees threshhold is either.

    Just a note on DEET....I have put gallons of it on my body over the years and I swear by it. I have lots of outdoorsy friends who honestly believe that things like aromatic soaps protect them.....I smell like DEET; they smell like flowers; I shower and feel great; they shower and count the number of bites all over their bodies.

  17. #17
    Thanks much to all of you for your comments and recommendations. Hopefully this will temper my wife's concerns about no screens on the rentals.

    Gary

  18. #18

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    I'm telling you, in these parts we don't have much of a skeeter problem till July and August. I think you will both be fine.

    And now that it has really cooled off, I hope the nasty fellas will be gone soon.

    Anyone notice that the flys are worse right now? Is is everywhere or just in my area? And why? Does it have to do with the grapes being ripe?

    Cyn

  19. #19

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    While I don't want to alarm anybody, mosquitos can be a problem in Italy. While April and November are not normally problem months, when an area does get mosquitos, they can be extremely aggressive. When I was in Venice at the beginning of July, I got eaten alive!

    Also, regardless of the number of mosquitos, they can still carry serious viruses. Because my husband is a U.S. Government contractor, he gets sent important alerts via e-mail regarding things like air/gas/trash strikes, politcal unrest, and health threats. Here is what he got as an e-mail just this morning:

    Health: Northern Italian town of Castiglione reports outbreak of chikungunya. Take precautions to prevent mosquito bites.

    This alert affects Italy.

    This alert began 04 Sep 2007 14:09 GMT and is scheduled to expire 20 Oct 2007 23:59 GMT.

    Current Situation
    Health authorities in Italy are reporting an outbreak of chikungunya in the small town of Castiglione di Cervia, approximately 18 km (11 miles) south-southeast of the city of Ravenna in Emilia Romagna region. The outbreak began in mid-July, but increased in intensity during August. As of early September, 100-150 residents of Castiglione had fallen ill. Public health officials are taking measures to eliminate mosquitoes in an effort to prevent spread of the disease.

    Background
    The chikungunya virus is transmitted by mosquitoes and has an incubation period of two-four days. The disease is similar to dengue fever and is characterized by sudden fever and debilitating joint pains. Chikungunya illness usually passes within two weeks without medication. During the acute phase, however, the patient is unable to walk.

    This is the first outbreak of chikungunya in Europe, but follows multiple reports of imported chikungunya illnesses in persons returning from India and Indian Ocean islands, where large outbreaks occurred in 2006.

    Advice
    Take precautions to avoid mosquito bites. The infection is infrequently fatal. Complications and death due to chikungunya are more frequent in persons who are pregnant, immunosuppressed or chronically ill. Check with your healthcare provider and consider deferring travel to the area of Castiglione if you have any of these conditions. Other areas of Italy are not reporting outbreaks.

  20. #20


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    Hello,
    "Mrs Jay" we too were in Venice at the beginning of July and didn't see, hear or feel a mosquito even though the weather was hot and sunny and we dined outside canal side each evening.

    I am very susceptible as I have lymphoedma so any bite could be extremely serious.
    I wear an insect repellent band with a natural deterrent but the little varmits lke my husband too but he wasn't bitten either and he didn't wear repellent.

    The worst mosquito infested place we've ever been in Italy is Sardinia where they were rampant even in October.
    I expect you have a good population in Sicily too?

    Thanks for the information about Chikungunya fever, sounds nasty.
    Wendy

  21. #21
    We were in Lake Como in early July, staying on the lake and had no problem with mosquitos. Our rental had doors through out that opened onto the lake. AT night,we pulled down these heavy plastic shade like things, which had holes in them for the air to pass through. I assume they were shades to keep the full sun out during the day, but they worked great. We were able to use the lights at night, and had no bugs coming into the our rental. Later on in the week, we stopped using them and just left the doors open. Hopefully, your place will have something similiar. Enjoy your trip!

    Barb

  22. #22

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    The mosquitos haven't been bad in Sicily at all this year. I've had a few bites, but nothing like I got over 5 days in Venice. When we were there, we had to leave our windows open at night because the B&B we stayed at didn't have A/C. That's when I suspect that I got bit. Our friends who were with also got several bites. I'm glad to hear that you didn't have any problems, though.

  23. #23
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    These things seem to be pretty unpredictable! Like Wendy, I had no trouble with mosquitoes in Venice this July (though, in the same apartment, they had been irritating in June the previous year). And this was the 3rd year when we spent most of August in Ostuni (Puglia): as well as being the hottest (and driest), this was the worst of the 3 for mosquitoes.

    Jonathan

  24. #24
    One minor thing -- mosquitoes prefer dark colors -- not that they won't bite you with light color clothes but dark ones most attractive to them.

  25. #25

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    I saw this on the Expats board:

    not sure if it is related but I have seen several dogs lately around Venice who are literally being pulled by their owner instead of being walked. When I asked why their legs weren't working, they explained they got bit by a mosquito carrying some disease and now their legs dont work!

    It's leishmaniosi. Unfortunately, unlike for filaria, there isn't yet a vaccine or a cure for this sickness, but prevention is possible with accurate cleaning of the dog's "quarters" (and in particular the bed), with mosquito repellents and with medical controls twice a year.

    I know this refers to pets, but I thought that some of you might travel with yours, and may find this useful.

  26. #26
    just a few things that i can't resist:

    the reason there are not screens in many houses in Italy is NOT because there are not mosquitos and bugs. In fact, you will see more and more screens on newer buildings...and those long twirly/jangly coverings for doorways are made to help keep mosquitos out. screens were just not common in italy.

    screens are an absolutley wonderful "luxury" during the late spring thru fall if you can find them in a rental property. zanzare, stink bugs, all types of insects migrate into houses during these times. i have been as far north as venice and as far south as sicily during the warm seasons and they all have bugs.

    that said, april is the "cusp" and you will probably be fine. but is your wife concerned only about mosquito bites or does she mind all types of creepy crawlies? if you rent a house in the country there could easily be some type of insect/bug etc around and she should expect that in country living

    best,

    claire

  27. #27
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Claire295:
    just a few things that i can't resist:

    the reason there are not screens in many houses in Italy is NOT because there are not mosquitoes and bugs. In fact, you will see more and more screens on newer buildings...and those long twirly/jangly coverings for doorways are made to help keep mosquitoes out. screens were just not common in italy.

    screens are an absolutley wonderful "luxury" during the late spring thru fall if you can find them in a rental property. zanzare, stink bugs, all types of insects migrate into houses during these times. i have been as far north as venice and as far south as sicily during the warm seasons and they all have bugs.

    that said, april is the "cusp" and you will probably be fine. but is your wife concerned only about mosquito bites or does she mind all types of creepy crawlies? if you rent a house in the country there could easily be some type of insect/bug etc around and she should expect that in country living

    best,

    claire </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

  28. #28


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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Mrs. Jay:
    [...] It's leishmaniosi. [...]
    I know this refers to pets, but I thought that some of you might travel with yours, and may find this useful. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Let's complete the info. Lishmaniosi is present in most of Italy, but particularly in the south and near the coasts. Apart from Leishmaniosi, in Italy pets may also catch filaria, again from mosquitoes. Luckily, you can pharmaceutically prevent filaria, so if you travel with a pet have a talk with his or her doc and request informations and medicines.
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  29. #29

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    I agree that April is not bad, but as the title of the thread is more general, I must weigh in. The news that Mrs J mention was all over the headlines in the last few days; personally that scares me cos that area is quite close and mosquitoes LOVE me. When I first moved here and was tortured by them I did a lot of research. It's the tiger mosquitoes (zanare tigre) which are the worst cos they are around both day and night, but I have found the hours between 4-7 are the absolute worst (these are also the hours I am outside and all the doors and windows are open). I use the little ovens with the Vape inserts that Cyndi mentioned -- boh.

    Anyway, being attractive to mosquitoes is 90% inherited. Yep, that's me. So all summer I am covered with welts which I scratch, which then bleed, and which sometimes even scar. I use deet, but they find the one square inch I missed. All-in-all attractive. I read this is not the experience of most, perhaps I am taking one for the team, no? Another problem is that you really don't see nor hear them coming.

    Oh, and just to get all the info out there, I hear that they don't survive above 400 meters. I need to move; this moment I am thinking Altopiano di Asiago is a good place.

  30. #30
    ouch, Karen sounds like you really get hit with them

    I agree, the tiger zanzare are the nastiest

    claire

  31. #31


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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">explained they got bit by a mosquito carrying some disease </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Leishmaniasis is transmitted by sandflies not by mosquitoes.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> Another problem is that you really don't see nor hear them coming. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Most likely if you do not hear or see them coming you are bitten by sandflies not by mozzies. This would explain why you get so bad reactions. Sandfly bites are worse than mosquito bites as they get infected easily. Make sure to use peroxide or other disinfectants on the bites.

  32. #32

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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> The mosquitos haven't been bad in Sicily at all this year. (Mrs. Jay) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I spent this past April in Ortigia, in a third floor bedroom with several windows, a terrace and no screens, and was bothered only one or two nights by a lone mosquito or two. The living space on the second floo (below) had many large windows and doors and another terrace off the kitchen (all open most of the day), and I don't recall insects of any kind being a problem. Frankly, I was surprised by this. Maybe it's proximity to the ocean, which was only a block away. Also, it was fairly breezy most days.

  33. #33


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    I don't think being by the ocean per se keeps the mosquitoes away. Maybe breezes will.
    Paestum and Tarquinia were abandoned in the 3-6th centuries AD partly because of malaria carried by mosquitoes.

    In BC antiquity when they were founded there were mosquitoes, but they did not carry malaria.

  34. #34
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    Just one more note....one of the "rules" of my climbing/hiking days:

    "It is far better to be prepared for something that doesn't happen than to be unprepared for something that does"

    Toss a small bottle of DEET in your luggage and enjoy Italy

  35. #35


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    Altho malaria, one of the worst of the mosquito-borne diseases, is no longer a problem in Italy, you may find the thread "Roman Fever?" of interest.

  36. #36


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    Not wanting to scare anyone, but this Article on the Chikungunya virus breaking out near Ravenna appeared today in the Independent (UK). Reportedly the first indigenous transmission of the mosquito-borne disease in Europe.
    DEET here we come.
    Chris Phillips
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  37. #37

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    Whether it is mosquitoes, flies, moths, or any other insect, I think they belong outside. When I moved to Umbria 39 years ago, finding ready made screens was impossible. My husband custom built them for our entire house. We have always been able to open all windows, capturing the balmy breezes with lights ON and NEVER have any "intruders". This also allows us to have, in effect, a "natural" AC just by opening up at night and creating cross breezes which help get the hot air out. Even in seasons other than full summer, there are insects which would love to come in since it is getting cool outside for their comfort. I can't imagine not having screens on all windows.

    We have screens on our windows at Genius Loci and guests love reading in bed, caressed by the balmy breezes, delighting at the evening and night sounds of nature - but NOT having to give a thought to bugs! I can't imagine it any other way for myself or for our guests.

  38. #38


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    When traveling in England several times in the last few years, I was very surprised to find they don't have screens there either--in city or village. It all seems very odd to me--such a simple improvement to quality of life, not to mention health issues.

  39. #39

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    That is EXACTLY the way I feel. More travelers should complain and perhaps screens would become more commonplace!
    Mary

  40. #40


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    Funny,that. Having spent my entire life looking out at the world thru screens, I really enjoy being able to look out over the mountains of the Sabina without the visual impediment of screens. In summer the breeze is stronger without; at other times of the year it's simply less of a visual barrier.
    That said, when the flies are out during the day, or the zanzare in the evenings, it is nice to pull down the screens and enjoy a bug-free existence.
    Chris Phillips
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  41. #41


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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Mary T.:
    That is EXACTLY the way I feel. More travelers should complain and perhaps screens would become more commonplace! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    That would occur if we Italians in first place decided that there are less toxic ways to avoid mosquitoes than poisoning ourselves along withnthe mozzies.
    Being an odd Italian belonging to the minority that believes that mosquito screens are happiness, I really had a hard time convincing a person used to spend most of his time poisoning mosquitoes while the shutters were closed to keep them from entering the room at night, and closed again at day, anytime of the day, be the sun beating on those windows or not, that a simple set of rolling screens could do the trick. And didn't succeed. His theory? "It makes me feel trapped it".
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  42. #42

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    I understand that, for some people, this could be a serious issue, but I have lived for 43 years in Tuscany without anti-insect screens and I'm still alive.

    I think that mosquitoes and other biting insects could be a real problem only from June to early September. In April they simply won't be there.

  43. #43


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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">That is EXACTLY the way I feel. More travelers should complain and perhaps screens would become more commonplace!
    Mary </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    This screen thing is just another one of those cultural preferences that divide Americans/Europeans/Italians. One can't expect to visit a foreign country and have it be just like home. On the other hand, I am glad I visit in the winter/early spring when the insect thing is not as much of an issue.
    Americans (myself included) feel this screen thing is a health, cleanliness issue. Italians wonder what's the big deal?
    Just like the ice/cold drink thing. Italians are sure that it is bad for your health, you are going to get a sore throat, etc. While the Americans really like the very cold drink and ice and KNOW that none of the aledged bad things actually happen when you drink very cold drinks.
    Each person thinks that their culture is the norm, and whatever the other group is doing is abberant.

  44. #44


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    Two years ago, first week of October in Rome, we made the mistake of leaving our windows open and not returning before nightfall to close them.

    I thought we were safe as I didn't SEE or hear any mosquitoes, but alas, the next morning I woke up with over 25 bites on me.
    My husband, same room and bed, had none.

    Now we make sure the windows are never open early in the morning or around dusk.

  45. #45


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    I am one of those people who swells up when I get bitten, this summer in Seattle I was not bitten maybe not many mosquitos this year but we just got back from San Fran and sat outside for the first night for about 20 minutes and was eaten alive! I didn't feel or even see them. In Greece have experienced loads even one time left Paros Island in Greece because they were every where! I now take mosquito nets with me. I have cut them up and brought duck tape and hang them in the doorways of balconys to keep the flies out and tape them to the windows. If mosquitos don't bother you then you have no problem but when you swell up like cyclops you need to improvise!

  46. #46
    We just returned from three+ weeks in Italy and can confirm that the only mosquitoes we encountered were in the parking lot of our hotel in Verona.

    I would like to thank the participants in this site for all of the good advice which made our first trip to Italy in 20 years a resounding success. You made our trip so easy - we knew enough to stamp in the rr ticket at the airport; to buy the Roma Pass at the Borghese; to apply for and receive passes for the Scavi tour; to take a guided tour of history and architecture of Rome through Context Travel; to take the funiculare in Capri; to enjoy the wonderful sites, in particular the arts center, in Taormina; to easily navigate the vaparetos in Venice; to visit Palladio architecture sites in Vicenza and see an opera in Verona (also don't miss Bergamo if you are in this area); then conclude our holiday on what may be the most beautiful place on earth, Lake Como. We also picked up tips on places to eat, to stay, and to see.

    Several of the posts on pickpockets that I have read in this forum may cause your readers to be overly concerned. We walked everywhere in Rome, Venice, Verona, and did not feel unsafe anywhere, anytime. Yes, you should be careful. No, you do need to worry. We walked the narrowest streets in Venice and Rome without concern. Before we left the US, we bought hidden waist-band wallets. By the third day we decided that they were unnecessary.

    It is unfair that Italy has all of this art and good food concentrated in one place. There is too much to see, and not enough time. It's like an amusement park for adults.

    For Christmas I want an espresso machine (why does anyone need such a contraption to make such a small product.) If I have that, the rest of my wishes may follow including a glass of wine at lunch, a siesta, a great dinner, and some sights and people to fill in the rest of the day.

    Thanks for listening.

  47. #47

    Slow Traveler

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    The best selling anti mosquito remedy in Italy is AUTAN, which is a clear liquid and can be purchased in any pharmacy. High does of vitamin B (to be ingested) are also efficacious, but any vitamin product in Italy is costly so purchase these before you come. Vitamin B does give your body a different odor and many do not find it pleasing.

    For those folks who really suffer from mosquito bites, Italian doctors believe that this is a form of allergic reaction to levening ingredients (yeast products), and recommend a diet regime of no wheat products of any kind for 2 full days, followed by a normal day, then repeat the cycle three times for a total of 9 days (minimum) up to 6 months.

    I have found for me, Lever2000 soap helps with mosquitos, as does Avon's Skin So Soft.

  48. #48

    Slow Traveler

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    Aug 2007
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    Rome and Umbria, Italy
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    I almost forgot to mention that you can get a homopathic remedy, Ledum Palustre 6, in Italy, which can be found at any omeopathic store.

    As for the coffee maker, why not take the lead of the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in NYC and buy a Bialetti 6-server stovetop coffee maker? It is in their 'best of' industrial design collection.

  49. #49


    Slow Traveler

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    Assisi, Umbria, Italy
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">AUTAN </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    This is the commercial name of DEET, the only real anti-mosquito repellent.

  50. #50


    Slow Traveler

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    St Paul, MN
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">It is unfair that Italy has all of this art and good food concentrated in one place </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    One could think that. It is because the Italian people are larger than life itself. They are an extremely creative, beauty and life-loving group of people. The ancient Greeks believed nothing in excess. Luckily for the rest of western civilization, the ancient Romans and their modern day inheritors, the Italians, paid no mind ot this. All that art, beauty, good food, superb architechture and urban developement tools (roads, aqueducts, sewers, etc) resulted from creative "highs" of the Romans and the Italian people. It's no accident that all this stuff is concentrated in one place.

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