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Gathering Hero

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Picture of Jane
posted
Many people know but others don't--when you purchase something, even a meal, you must be given a receipt and walk out of the establishment with it. If you don't and if the Guardia di Finanzia stops you, both you and the establishment will be fined.

Many people believe that this is not something that really happens so I will share today.

We left our favorite little corner enoteca after a nice lunch. As soon as we stepped out the door, we were stopped by two members of the Guardia di Finanzia- the branch of the Italian military that polices tax evasion, badges were shown and the receipt was requested. Fortunately, we had it as we always do.

A lot of little tourist stores or even non-tourist stores will try not to give you one--particularly tourists who do not know the law. Then the transaction is not recorded for tax purposes.

Be sure to always request your receipt--even for a €1 item. You will be fined if you do not have it--even from the gelateria.
 
Posts: 8161 | Location: San Diego, CA | Registered: 26 June 2001Report This Post

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Two types of goods are exempt, books and newspapers/magazines because tax work differnetly for them. Also, the receipt also be a small slip from the "calculator", just make sure it does not carry (in color along one side) the words "non valido come scontrino fiscale" or just "non fiscale", and that it carries name and address of the shop, date and progressive ID number, Check the two receipts in the Paying the bill at the resturant" page by Pauline: the first and "forla" one is a legally valid bill and receipt carrying name and address of the resturant, date and progressive number, while the other is not legally valid since it's written on white paper, carrying no IDs and no clearly stated prices and total.


Alice Twain
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A Typesetter's day 3.0: Blog.
 
Posts: 10690 | Location: Milano, Italy | Registered: 06 December 2002Report This Post

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Not having ever been stopped in twelve years (whether I happen to have a receipt or not), what IS the fine, anyway?

I'm well aware, of course, that this is the Law, and I am almost always shoved an official receipt when I pay. However, if I'm racing through for a quick caffè, I know myself well enough that I won't browbeat a proprietor for another slip of paper to throw away so that the Guardia can get its cut from a ,85 cup of coffee.

(I'm not advocating my behaviour, understand. It's the Big Brother thing that gets to me.)
 
Posts: 3364 | Location: Venezia, Italia | Registered: 15 January 2005Report This Post

Gathering Hero

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Backing up what Alice explained--today they looked very carefully at the date and time along with the other info. I have been told that the fine can be pretty hefty but really have no idea. It seems that most fines in Italy are not small.
 
Posts: 8161 | Location: San Diego, CA | Registered: 26 June 2001Report This Post

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It used to be €500 for the client and many times more for the vendor, but I hear that the client fine is reduced.
 
Posts: 2864 | Location: Umbria | Registered: 13 September 2001Report This Post

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That's right, the client that leaves without receipt is not fined anymore, the shopowner may be fined, I think, up to 5,000 euro. beware, though, that by not requesting a receipt (scontrino or fattura) you help the shopowner to evade taxes, the taxes that pay for Italy's health services, for police and carabinieri, that keep the museums open and cheap, the Colosseo and the Foro Romano up, Pompei open to visits...


Alice Twain
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Posts: 10690 | Location: Milano, Italy | Registered: 06 December 2002Report This Post

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It is rather the other way around, I fear: it's the foreign tourist that supports the Italian government. We are taxed on everything — oh I know in theory we can go places and get the tax removed, but have you tried it? — but do not get the benefits of the healthcare system etc. Europe is to some extent (used to be much more) supported by foreign tourism.

In the States such sales taxes are small, usually 5 or 6% (excepting some larger cities); and not hidden. In Europe, these taxes are huge, often 20+ %, and concealed from the purchaser. Everybody knows they're there, mind you, but not seeing them day in day out as in the States, makes it easier for the government to get away with it. I suspect the reason for this is that Europeans are far better at cheating on their income taxes than Americans; so the gummint goes after shopkeepers and tourists and creates one more burdensome and costly layer of bureaucracy to do it.
 
Posts: 4550 | Registered: 06 January 2002Report This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by Bill Thayer:
In the States such sales taxes are small, usually 5 or 6% (excepting some larger cities); and not hidden. In Europe, these taxes are huge, often 20+ %, and concealed from the purchaser.

Allow me to point out a few things.

  • In first place we pay the exact same taxes and do so for the whole year round. Plus we pay a number of other taxes you ar exempted from.
  • Secondly all EU countries signed a pact where the health systems of any country can be used by visitors from other countries while on holiday: in other words if I break my leg while in Greece, I get to use their medical failities for free as a Greek would. It would be theoretically possible for any other country sign a similar pact, and a few non EU countries have done so.
  • Also, non Eu visitors in itlay can have the full use of our health structures for free, this is not true for italian visitors in the US, for instance. If during a holiday you would fall and break a leg, you would be brought to an Italian ER and assisted TOTALLY FREE sa any Italian would; yet, if while visiting the US I would fall and break a leg, I would still be requested to pay for the medical assistance.
  • Other services, like the police, are totally free all the times for everyone. Yet others are paid by Italian residents only, that's the case for tap water that you don't pay at all, thus when you come to Italy, turn the tap and drink a glass of water, you can do so because the Italian residents pay for your water.
  • Finally, VAT in Italy ranges from the 4 to the 20%. The 20% rate is applied to jewels, fur coats and luxury cars, while everyday items are taxed in a range that goes from 4 to 10%, with the most necessary ones, like food and books, at 4%.


Alice Twain
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A Typesetter's day 3.0: Blog.
 
Posts: 10690 | Location: Milano, Italy | Registered: 06 December 2002Report This Post

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Stir the pot, and I learn something. What EU residents get out of each other's taxes of course is not germane; and I  can hardly disagree that we foreigners benefit from the police and sewage and such things.

The care of stray Americans breaking our legs in Europe, though, is new to me. Are you sure of that Alice? (If so my malevolence will shift — hey, I had vinegar for breakfast this morning — to the American purveyors of medical travel insurance, who tell us that if we don't buy their product, and then need an appendectomy in Brindisi, we're sunk.)

It is not new to me that foreigners falling ill here aren't covered by America! but neither are Americans. Almost all Americans get their health insurance thru their (private) employment.
 
Posts: 4550 | Registered: 06 January 2002Report This Post

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quote:
I suspect the reason for this is that Europeans are far better at cheating on their income taxes than Americans; so the gummint goes after shopkeepers and tourists and creates one more burdensome and costly layer of bureaucracy to do it.

I don't believe myself that this is the exact reason. It just human nature to pay as little tax as one can get away with. I don't think it is because the Italians are "better" at it than Americans.
It is the Italian/European system of tax levy and collection that allows more cheating to occur. First of all more of their taxes are VAT taxes than ours, in which a merchant has to collect and send to the government. More of Italy is a cash economy and less is done with credit cards and using electronic means. More of our taxes are payroll taxes and paid to the recipients using electronic means that leave a "paper" trail or maybe a ("magnetic" trail really) for the taxman to discover and follow. My check is electronically deposited in my checking account and besides my employer, the bank has records on exactly how much was deposited in the account after taxes were withheld. Our employers have no vested interest to underwithhold. It's all the same to them. Employers don't get to keep what the taxman doesn't get. A merchant does get to keep the VAT tax on an item that is not reported.
Maybe Americans should lobby for these VAT taxes that the Republicans come up with from time to time so that we could have the same opportunities as the Europeans to underreport?
 
Posts: 5414 | Location: St Paul, MN | Registered: 10 February 2006Report This Post
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quote:
Almost all Americans get their health insurance thru their (private) employment.


Whoa, Bill, check your facts there. I know this isn't the place for this discussion. I pay for my insurance, because I am lucky enough to be able to afford it.
 
Posts: 356 | Registered: 25 November 2003Report This Post

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Stray American here. Big Grin I was cared for, expertly, for five days in hospital in Pisa - free of charge. And I had an operation to repair my broken ankle. I will never forget the kindness of the nursing staff and doctors.

All these taxes even out, don't you think? Nations just have different ways of assessing them. Alice, isn't there a tax on televisions and radios in Italy? In America, we pay a tax on our cable subscriptions - similar notion. America has plenty of hidden taxes built in to the price of goods, like gasoline. The amount of tax on gasoline varies but it's considerable.


"I am a Southerner. I like the feel of these words. I could no more be otherwise than I could shed my outer skin or change the color of my eyes." Willie Morris

 
Posts: 1590 | Location: on the Alabama River | Registered: 22 July 2002Report This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by Alice Twain:
Beware, though, that by not requesting a receipt (scontrino or fattura) you help the shopowner to evade taxes, the taxes that pay for Italy's health services, for police and carabinieri, that keep the museums open and cheap, the Colosseo and the Foro Romano up, Pompei open to visits...


...Yes, AND -some say most of all- all of our politician salaries!!!! Happy


www.il-girasole.com

"Your mind not only wanders, it sometime leaves completely..."
 
Posts: 2471 | Location: Cortona, Tuscany, Italia | Registered: 29 October 2002Report This Post

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I think that's accurate, that most Americans do get health coverage thru work; but in any case, that some or even many people pay for health insurance themselves doesn't affect the other fact, in the context of Italian taxation practices, that the U. S. government by and large does not, except for the very poor.

Interesting the power of facts; Bags Packed being well cared for in Italy, and for free, is radically shifting my viewpoint. Thanks Alice, thanx BP. Like I said, stir the pot, learn something.
 
Posts: 4550 | Registered: 06 January 2002Report This Post

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Jane, thanks for sharing your experience. I've always known about keeping your receipt but had never heard any first hand account of being stopped.
 
Posts: 9691 | Location: San Diego, sometimes | Registered: 20 March 2002Report This Post

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Dragonpat, it's called a flat tax, simply a national sales tax and it has been discussed. I don't know about under reporting by merchants, but it certainly might keep me from spending.


"I am a Southerner. I like the feel of these words. I could no more be otherwise than I could shed my outer skin or change the color of my eyes." Willie Morris

 
Posts: 1590 | Location: on the Alabama River | Registered: 22 July 2002Report This Post

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quote:
The care of stray Americans breaking our legs in Europe, though, is new to me. Are you sure of that Alice?


Alice is correct. Emergency medical services are free for foreign visitors in Italy. Break a leg here, or get your appendix removed as an emergency, and your treatment is courtesy of the Italian tax payer.
 
Posts: 3999 | Registered: 30 July 2005Report This Post

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As an employed person in the UK , it is very difficult to evade or avoid paying tax(one results in jail and the other results in large accountants fees!) taxes - I was amazed when I lived for a while in the US and friends were storing away receipts and worrying about submitting their detailed tax reports and having a dreaded 'audit'. The Government here has whittled away at all tax allowances, so that there is very little left above a standard personal allowance. Makes the tax return simple and it's only if you have quite complicated circumstances of self employment and/or investments that you need an accountant.

There has always been a thriving 'black' economy - 'how much for cash, mate? ' but it can backfire - no receipt, no proof if there is a problem. And as for trying to delay or avoid paying VAT - the VAT inspectors are very vigorous in pursuit.

Sales Tax US style - when you are used to it, it must be OK but as a visitor I find it irritating that what it says on the shelf or the item is not neccessarily what I pay at the till (and not even the same around the country.) I'm not objecting to paying it or asking to be let off because I don't get much direct benefit myself - it's the method of collection that grates,just because it is not what I am used to . At least with VAT, it is in the total price (unless we are talking about larger services and the average tourist isn't)- does it matter what the total price is composed of? Do you start questioning how the shopkeeper decides how to allocate the rent, rates, salaries, profit margin to each item that you choose in a shop ?

By paying for an item in an American shop, am I not also contributing to other (non sales ) taxes - income tax on salaries, property taxes etc?
 
Posts: 5539 | Location: London, UK | Registered: 20 September 2006Report This Post

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quote:
Emergency medical services are free for foreign visitors in Italy.
Absolutely true. I am typing this left-handed as I broke my right arm, sadly on only the second day of our planned Italian vacation a few weeks ago. Even though this happened on the day of a medical strike, the emergency personnel at the Orvieto Hospital gave me excellent care. When I've been recounting this story at home, everyone is amazed to hear that this was all completely free for me.
 
Posts: 9153 | Location: Napa, CA | Registered: 01 August 2004Report This Post

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Mercurial Boobykins of course now wants to be sure that Jonathan's little restaurant in Taranto paid at least some of the hemiencephalectomy I'm eventually bound to wind up having in Italy if I spend as much time there as I do.... (I wondered about that a bit when I first read it; did you get a proper scontrino Jonathan?)
 
Posts: 4550 | Registered: 06 January 2002Report This Post

Gathering Hero

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It never ceases to amaze me the turns that threads take sometimes. Of course, I must admit that I am sometimes responsible for them so can't complain. Big Grin
 
Posts: 8161 | Location: San Diego, CA | Registered: 26 June 2001Report This Post

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Thanks for stirring, Bill. I learned something too.
 
Posts: 785 | Location: Fairfax, VA | Registered: 30 June 2005Report This Post

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Dragonpat, it's called a flat tax, simply a national sales tax and it has been discussed. I don't know about under reporting by merchants, but it certainly might keep me from spending.

Yes that is what "they" call it when they bring it up. It is just like VAT. For the record, I am not in favor of it unless Americans could use it to fund National Health care like the Europeans have. I myself believe that the American health insurance system is now so unfair that it borders on immoral.

I am not in favor of a "flat" national sales tax to be implemented to replace current income taxes.
 
Posts: 5414 | Location: St Paul, MN | Registered: 10 February 2006Report This Post

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quote:
did you get a proper scontrino Jonathan?)


No, not the first (2004) time! But on my two subsequent visits (05 & 06), there have been proper printed scontrini. Maybe they had a visit from the G di F in the meantime.

Mind you, with prices as cheap as that trattoria's, I'm not sure those brain surgeons are going to be buying new scalpels yetawhile...

Jonathan
 
Posts: 4537 | Location: Stroud, UK | Registered: 18 November 2001Report This Post

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quote:
it's called a flat tax, simply a national sales tax and it has been discussed


The flat tax proposed by Steve Forbes in his run for the presidency and explained in some of his articles in Forbes Magazine was not a sales tax or a value added tax, but an revamping of our income tax system.

I didn't vote for him but I really liked his idea on the Flat Tax.

Bill


Bill
 
Posts: 2920 | Location: Texas | Registered: 18 March 2006Report This Post

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Folks, as interesting as the "thread drift" is, we need to restrict our comments to the matter at hand--the Law of Receipts in Italy.

Thanks for your cooperation.


Amy in MA
Destination Anywhere

"A traveler without knowledge is a bird without wings."--Sa'di, Gulistan (1258)
 
Posts: 11695 | Location: Newton (outside Boston), MA | Registered: 17 June 2001Report This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by Bill Thayer:
(If so my malevolence will shift — hey, I had vinegar for breakfast this morning — to the American purveyors of medical travel insurance, who tell us that if we don't buy their product, and then need an appendectomy in Brindisi, we're sunk.)

Private travel insurance still has a use: in case you are stranded because of a major health problem, while the Italian health system will provide free emergency care, it will not provide for the emergency travel back, possibily with life supporting systems in tag. If your problem is simply an appendicetomy you can trust our hospitals to give you all the assistance you may need, and if your conditions allow you may even travel on, maybe a bit more relaxedly than you planned, but if you have a major problem, emergency healthcare is not enough, this is when travel insurance comes handy. Obviously, onc eyou know that if you travel to Italy you will not need to pay for emergecy treatments, you can ask for your insurance not to cover emergency care and thus pay less for it ^__^

By the way, the bulk of the health system is funded not through IVA (or VAT) but through taxes paid by the workers on their salaries, so tourists pai IVA on Italian products to support parts of the sytem they don't get to enjoy,, like the parliament, while italians pay their "tassa della Salute (health tax) to also pay for Roz's arm and bags Packed's ankle. ^____^


Alice Twain
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A Typesetter's day 3.0: Blog.
 
Posts: 10690 | Location: Milano, Italy | Registered: 06 December 2002Report This Post

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Last Sept. in Perugia, we were stopped in the dark of the big main piazza, shortly after leaving a restaurant on the piazza.
These two guys furtively flashed what we assumed was ID.
Then asked us if we had just had dinner in that restaurant.
I had forgotten about the receipts law, and told my husband to keep walking. He stopped however, and they made us walk back to the restaurant with them.
The owner said yes we had just eaten there, and the two officials took down our names and nationality, painstakingly writing it on the back of a newspaper!
They didn't ask us for our passports, or where we were staying.
It frightened my husband, who was convinced he was about to be hauled off to jail, Eekand I think it was designed to frighten the restaurant owner.
So keep your receipts!!!!!!!!!!!; as it does happen that you will be stopped occasionally.
The next day a Guardia Finanza car drove past us, and my husband said he recognized one of the previous night's fellows in the back.
 
Posts: 1174 | Location: "Wet" Coast,Canada | Registered: 01 January 2006Report This Post

Gathering Hero

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Regarding medical care, last spring my daughter dislocated her shoulder in Capri - paramedics were called, as was an ambulance, she was taken to a clinic, her shoulder was treated and we were never billed. We are most appreciative of the care she received.

And Jane, I am glad you posted about receipts; it is indeed a useful travel tip. It is amazing, I agree, how topics will go in a direction that was never intended.

Marcia


Marcia

"The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page." Saint Augustine
Happy Trails to Us: My Reluctant Blog
 
Posts: 5519 | Location: South Pasadena, California | Registered: 06 April 2005Report This Post

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quote:
parts of the sytem they don't get to enjoy,, like the parliament


oh yes, we do enjoy that!
 
Posts: 2301 | Location: Assisi, Umbria, Italy | Registered: 18 February 2004Report This Post

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May I suggest that if the tourists make sure they get receipts it is much easier to do trip reports which most of us enjoy.
 
Posts: 711 | Location: Wichita, Ks. USA | Registered: 08 October 2002Report This Post
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It's nice to be reminded that the hefty income taxes that shrink my monthly salary find a useful destination, beyond the ever-growing money wasted in paying useless bureaucrats...

Thank you for the reminder Smile



 
Posts: 336 | Location: Tuscany, Italy | Registered: 03 December 2006Report This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by Pat and Henry:
May I suggest that if the tourists make sure they get receipts it is much easier to do trip reports which most of us enjoy.
Excellent point!


ellen
 
Posts: 4398 | Location: mahwah, new jersey, usa | Registered: 10 December 2003Report This Post


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Hi all,
Two things, a question and a comment:
1. How long do I have to keep my receipts? (I think I actually have a box of them upstairs as interesting souvenirs. Cool )

2. I, too, was helped by the Italian medical services; to wit - anaphalatic shock from mistakenly eating a piece of pizza al taglio with anchovy. Used my epi pen and they called pronto socoro. Never got a bill, nor was I asked to pay for the ambulance, the emergency room, the physician(s) who treated me, or the medicines. Here, I would have received bills from everyone involved.

As I tell my students - different country, different rules.

DMae
 
Posts: 529 | Registered: 05 March 2005Report This Post
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quote:
It is rather the other way around, I fear: it's the foreign tourist that supports the Italian government.


Just to offer a bit of perspective since it's easy for us as tourists (or travelers) to overestimate our contribution.

The most recent and most trustworthy information that I was able to find in a quick search suggests that tourism accounts for around 2% of Italy's GNP.

That's not an insignificant sum, but if tourism were taken completely out of the picture, although there would be a huge impact in certain areas, the country as a whole would hardly notice.

As someone who lives in a tourist area I'm acutely aware of how much tourism costs a locality.

pete
 
Posts: 340 | Registered: 04 September 2006Report This Post

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Just trying to imagine how I'd feel about a bunch of IRS guys with nothing else to do hanging around outside restaurants asking me to show them my receipt to see if I'd paid the sales tax.

In the end, I believe travelers will run into very few occasions when they aren't provided a receipt, but I also think it's interesting how few people have actually had this experience. Tocca ferro...or knock on wood, I'll hasten to add.
 
Posts: 3364 | Location: Venezia, Italia | Registered: 15 January 2005Report This Post

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1) When I broke a tooth and had to get some dental work in Venice, I had to pay a small amount. Maybe dental isn't considered medical treatment. Maybe it wasn't considered an emergency.

2) I asked (in English) several times for a receipt for my stay in a hotel. The response was basically "Yes", "OK", etc., but never resulted in a receipt. What should I do? I had a really nice stay and got to know the people running the hotel, so I didn't want to make a fuss by saying that I was going to call the Guardia di Finanzia. What would have been an alternative?

At another hotel, the bill was written in pencil on a piece of blank, torn-off scrap of paper, and it was too much by 75 Euros. But they spoke no English, and I didn't know enough Italian, so after a while I gave up and paid them the money. Needless to say I didn't get a receipt. This was in such a tiny town that they may not have had any police. What could I have done?
 
Posts: 618 | Location: Northern VA | Registered: 13 October 2004Report This Post

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quote:
It is rather the other way around, I fear: it's the foreign tourist that supports the Italian government.


Living in a very touristed city, I have the clear impression that services to tourists are financed out of taxes paid by everybody, while tourist money goes mainly to a relatively restricted class of shop, restaurant and hotel keepers. They pay taxes as well, and their taxes get charged back to tourists as an increase of prices, but this is not proportional to the expenses tourists generate.

Here in Florence the center, being of touristic interest, is generally better mantained than the outskirts even if the bulk of taxpayers is in the outskirts. It is better policed (just past the walls ring, you can live two months without seeing a policeman). Restaurants and shops generate garbage collection problems, paid out of garbage collection tax; but they do not pay proportionally to the garbage they produce.


Luca Logi aka itarchivarius
 
Posts: 2103 | Location: Firenze, Italy | Registered: 09 June 2005Report This Post
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OK may I ask another question about receipts?
I know they are policed in the big cities but are they policed in the villages or smaller towns? Anyone have any experiences about small towns?
 
Posts: 303 | Registered: 11 March 2007Report This Post

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In twelve years of traveling and living in Italy, the two occurrences on this thread are the only ones I have ever heard of. Has it happened to anyone else, by chance?
 
Posts: 3364 | Location: Venezia, Italia | Registered: 15 January 2005Report This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by DMae:
Hi all,
Two things, a question and a comment:
1. How long do I have to keep my receipts? (I think I actually have a box of them upstairs as interesting souvenirs. Cool )


For 100 meter outside the store, then you can dump it. Few years ago I was in Rome, and I noticed a man following me after coming out a restaurant -I was out of the restaurant- I dumped some stuff in a paper basket.
The man stops me and ask me the receipt for the restaurant I had been. I said " It is in the paper basket 50 meters behind, why didn't you ask me right off the restaurant?" he said i had to keep the receipt for all day, I said no, thanked him and walked away.
He couldn't do anything else that watching me go away.

PS The restaurant didn't give me any receipt Razz


www.il-girasole.com

"Your mind not only wanders, it sometime leaves completely..."
 
Posts: 2471 | Location: Cortona, Tuscany, Italia | Registered: 29 October 2002Report This Post

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Stupenda! I have just learned how to handle this situation should it ever happen to me. Happy
 
Posts: 3364 | Location: Venezia, Italia | Registered: 15 January 2005Report This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by Bottegal:
2) I asked (in English) several times for a receipt for my stay in a hotel. The response was basically "Yes", "OK", etc., but never resulted in a receipt. What should I do? I had a really nice stay and got to know the people running the hotel, so I didn't want to make a fuss by saying that I was going to call the Guardia di Finanzia. What would have been an alternative?

At another hotel, the bill was written in pencil on a piece of blank, torn-off scrap of paper, and it was too much by 75 Euros. But they spoke no English, and I didn't know enough Italian, so after a while I gave up and paid them the money. Needless to say I didn't get a receipt. This was in such a tiny town that they may not have had any police. What could I have done?


Nothing more that what you have done. Unless you want to call the Guardia di Finanza.

I mean, the restaurant, or hotel, or shop owner knows all to weel what the risks are, and the customer doesn't risk anything. So if the guardia di finanza comes, well, too bad for the bad guy that didn't give you the receipt.

One thing I want to point out is that this rule shouldn't make anyone feel like they can be policeman too.

You are the customer, entitled to get a receipt, but you are not the tax patrol police.
If the shop owner doesn't want to give a regular receipt to you, what else can you do - other than calling the GdF and be involved on denounces, and long written reports?- beat them up?

Call the army?


www.il-girasole.com

"Your mind not only wanders, it sometime leaves completely..."
 
Posts: 2471 | Location: Cortona, Tuscany, Italia | Registered: 29 October 2002Report This Post

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According to the Italian State Tourist Board, or at least its web site, the fee for a customer not having the receipt upon request is 155 Euros.

http://www.italiantouristboard.co.uk/it/ind/i78.html

The site also indicates it is the obligation of the foreign tourist to get the receipt.
 
Posts: 1147 | Registered: 22 August 2004Report This Post

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Slow Traveler
Picture of Jonathan
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quote:
is 155 Euros.


The site actually says 'up to €155'

Jonathan
 
Posts: 4537 | Location: Stroud, UK | Registered: 18 November 2001Report This Post

Gathering Hero

Slow Traveler
Picture of Jane
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Sydney Girl:
OK may I ask another question about receipts?
I know they are policed in the big cities but are they policed in the villages or smaller towns? Anyone have any experiences about small towns?


The experience I started this thread with was in a small town just yesterday.
 
Posts: 8161 | Location: San Diego, CA | Registered: 26 June 2001Report This Post
Traveler
posted Hide Post
This has happened to me as well - I went to the bar downstairs from my work and got an ice cream. I knew them so I knew they wouldn't overcharge me and I was in a hurry so I didn't ask (or didn't care) about the receipt.

Two men in plain clothes stopped us right outside the bar and asked for the receipt, which I didn't have. Worse, I had changed ice cream that day (I think a Cornetto instead of an ice pop, etc.) so I couldn't even tell them how much I had paid! Che figura...

They made us go back inside and the workers had to issue (a new) receipt. I was scolded properly.

From what I was told by them, there are a few things to consider when keeping receipts:
- You keep it until consumption, especially in the case of food. (I hadn't eaten my ice cream so I still should have had it in my possession.)
- You have to leave the establishment with the receipt even if you did consume the good-product (i.e., Alessandra leaving the restaurant)

I've never heard of anyone actually getting a fine, but it can happen! Just be sure and throw your receipts away at the end of the day at home, if you want to be sure.

I never keep mine.
 
Posts: 79 | Location: Milan, Italy | Registered: 06 January 2007Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of JDeQ
posted Hide Post
Thanks for the post Jane. I wondered why I was always given a receipt for a small item i.e. a scoop of gelato or an apple from a street fruit vendor. It seemed like such a waste at the time but now I understand why it is the case.


Jerry

The traveler sees what he sees. The tourist sees what he has come to see. ~G.K. Chesterton

Blog: A Life, Lived
Taste of the Windy City Trip Report
A Whirlwind Bite of the Big Apple at Christmas
Gelato, Ceramics, Art, Pasta, Ruins, Oh My!
 
Posts: 3833 | Location: Burlington, ON, Canada | Registered: 12 April 2006Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Alice Twain
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Bottegal:
1) When I broke a tooth and had to get some dental work in Venice, I had to pay a small amount. Maybe dental isn't considered medical treatment. Maybe it wasn't considered an emergency.

Some dental work is considered emergency, but the only cures covered as emergency are extractions performed at an ER by a surgeon (who does not have to be also a dentist) and a handful of other things. Reconstruction is not performed at ERs and not considered emergency. In some regions, dental care is not even included in the health services provided by the local Health System, that's the case for Lombardy since a few years. Also, you get the free treatment only if you go at public hospitals, owned by the helath system, or at a number of private hospitals (privately owned) that act in acord with the health system. Any other place is not only privately owned but also acting separtely from the public health system and therefore you have to pay just like in the US.

For the cases you listed, you may try to further convince the owners that you really need the legal receipt in order to get a reimbursement. if this does not work, don't go to the local police: the local police does not deal with such cases, you have to get in contact with Guardia di Finanza, which is stationed in each and every provincial capital plus several other places. You can get in cotnact with GdF by calling emergency number 117. YOu can also report to this number in ase some shopowner tries to give you counterfait money or goods. Over 220,000 GdF patrols are available 24/7 throughout Italy.

How long to keep the receipt? One good reason to keep the recepit is that it is valid as insurance on the purchased good. if you purchas, say, a cellphone, make sure you keep the receipt for one year to request repairs if the phone stops working.


Alice Twain
--
A Typesetter's day 3.0: Blog.
 
Posts: 10690 | Location: Milano, Italy | Registered: 06 December 2002Report This Post
New Member
posted Hide Post
Is it possible to clarify what the law is? Alice says there is no longer a fine placed on the customer (I have heard this elsewhere as well). But the website posted by Will Travel (Italian gov't website in UK) says the fine is still in place. (Though that website may just not have been updated).
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 31 May 2007Report This Post
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