Slow Travel Talk  Hop To Forum Categories  TRAVEL  Hop To Forums  Italy    Mosquitoes in Italy
Page 1 2 

Moderators: Andrew, Doru, Jonathan, TourMama

Closed Topic Closed
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Mosquitoes in Italy Login/Join 

Slow Traveler
Picture of Alice Twain
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by KatB:
Rome had no mosquitoes IMHO this had to do with the smog.

In that case Milano would have negative mosquitoes, since Milano is much heavier on pollution than Rome. The sad truth is that they are so many and so big that we commonly call them "helicopters". Actually, a good reason why Rome has less mosquitoes than Milano is probably the wind.


Alice Twain
--
A Typesetter's day 3.0: Blog.
 
Posts: 10690 | Location: Milano, Italy | Registered: 06 December 2002Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Judith in Umbria
posted Hide Post
I've waited for the season to be over to report that this year in Umbria-- perhaps the most humid part of Italy-- I have experienced two mosquitoes . Neither one bit me.

In past years I've used Fargon on gazillions of bites.
 
Posts: 2864 | Location: Umbria | Registered: 13 September 2001Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Barbara (and Art)
posted Hide Post
I too think location plays a big part. When we first bought our house I was afraid the backyard would be buggy, esp at night, since we backed up to a park...(then abandoned, now restored). I bought citronella candles to be ready....and after 4 years have never used them! I think our hilltown breezes keep them at bay, altho the few that do find their way here seem to perfer me over Art.
 
Posts: 6568 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 29 June 2001Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Tim in Piemonte
posted Hide Post
Echoing Judith, I would like to add that here in Piedmont this year's quasi-drought (which finally broke in August), which although beeing tough on the soil and plants (lots of dead trees in the forests and stressed plants) was beneficial in that we had a bare minimum of our usual midgie-widgie mosquitos who like to come out to feed in the summer months when we are all sitting down to an al fresco eveing meal and enjoying the wonderful evenings. I don't think I got one bite this year. Of course we still burnedthe citronella candles and kept the lotions at hand as a reassurance.
 
Posts: 755 | Location: Asti, Piedmont, Italy | Registered: 08 May 2006Report This Post
Traveler
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Claire295:
just a few things that i can't resist:

the reason there are not screens in many houses in Italy is NOT because there are not mosquitos and bugs. In fact, you will see more and more screens on newer buildings...and those long twirly/jangly coverings for doorways are made to help keep mosquitos out. screens were just not common in italy.

Mainly zanzare although she does seem to freak out over most creepy crawlies.

screens are an absolutley wonderful "luxury" during the late spring thru fall if you can find them in a rental property. zanzare, stink bugs, all types of insects migrate into houses during these times. i have been as far north as venice and as far south as sicily during the warm seasons and they all have bugs.

that said, april is the "cusp" and you will probably be fine. but is your wife concerned only about mosquito bites or does she mind all types of creepy crawlies? if you rent a house in the country there could easily be some type of insect/bug etc around and she should expect that in country living

best,

claire
 
Posts: 12 | Registered: 04 March 2007Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of gardkarlsen
posted Hide Post
Hi

My wife and I stayed at a house in Tuscany in July and we did not have any trouble with mosquitoes...I guess it is due to the fact that it gets a bit chilly at night after the sun goes down. In our room we did have some bugs....a huge spider in the bathroom right over our toilet. The funny thing is that it didn't move for days and all of a sudden it was gone and that makes you start speculating where it has gone Wink We also had a weird looking green bug with lots of hair/legs and that moved really fast. That was also moving around on the wall and the ceiling so the wife was a bit nervous when we turned of the light to go to bed.

Hope you will have a great trip...and hopefully you won't have a bug problem Wink
 
Posts: 986 | Location: Stavanger, Norway | Registered: 11 September 2003Report This Post

Hero-2009, 2012

Slow Traveler
Picture of Americana in Parigi
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by gardkarlsen:
In our room we did have some bugs....a huge spider in the bathroom right over our toilet. The funny thing is that it didn't move for days and all of a sudden it was gone and that makes you start speculating where it has gone Wink We also had a weird looking green bug with lots of hair/legs and that moved really fast. That was also moving around on the wall and the ceiling so the wife was a bit nervous when we turned of the light to go to bed.


Gag me!
Please tell us where your rental was so that I will stay 10 km away from it.
 
Posts: 7807 | Location: Paris, France | Registered: 01 March 2007Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Judith in Umbria
posted Hide Post
You just can't come to Italy. We've more bugs all over than you can shake a stick at, and that doesn't work anyway. I'm just used to it, but spiders and ants are ordinary. It would require making the atmosphere really poisonous not to have them come in and out.
 
Posts: 2864 | Location: Umbria | Registered: 13 September 2001Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of gardkarlsen
posted Hide Post
quote:

Gag me!
Please tell us where your rental was so that I will stay 10 km away from it.


Hi

If you think you can go to a warm destination and not experience a single bug I think you have to think again Cool Even here in Norway we get the occasional bug inside our flat so I don't think there is that much you can do about it....they have us outnumbered I'm afraid There There
 
Posts: 986 | Location: Stavanger, Norway | Registered: 11 September 2003Report This Post

Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
quote:
If you think you can go to a warm destination and not experience a single bug I think you have to think again

I have to say that in the winter in Rome and the Bay of Naples the bugs were quite tolerable (ie not even noticable). At the begining of April in Rome we didn't see any bugs in our apartment. Maybe it was because it had not really warmed up yet.

All climates have some bugs. Most years in Minneapolis we have tons of mosquitoes June-sept, but we have screens on all the windows to keep the bugs outside while we sleep. I get spiders in my bathroom also, especially in the fall. I think they crawl in through the ventilation fan. They don't live in the bathroom long though. I kill them if they are high enough up. The cats think they are great toys. We get mice occassionally also after a big rain. Similarly, they do not last very long.
 
Posts: 5404 | Location: St Paul, MN | Registered: 10 February 2006Report This Post
Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
All climates have some bugs. Most years in Minneapolis we have tons of mosquitoes June-sept, but we have screens on all the windows to keep the bugs outside while we sleep.

I hear you there dragonpat. My hubby says that mosquitoes are the state bird.
 
Posts: 109 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 14 April 2007Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Barbara (and Art)
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Americana in Parigi:
Gag me!
Please tell us where your rental was so that I will stay 10 km away from it.
I guess this wouldn't be the time to mention the scorpions....... Roll Eyes
 
Posts: 6568 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 29 June 2001Report This Post


Slow Traveler
Picture of Alpinista
posted Hide Post
quote:
I guess this wouldn't be the time to mention the scorpions....... Roll Eyes


You beat me to it Thumbs Up

Our first day routine at our house is to drive up, toss bug bombs everywhere, go grocery shopping, return home to sweep out the spiders and scorpions, and to tread lightly at night when going to the bathroom.

My favorite Italian insect is the huge beetle that flies around dumbly until they crash into the side of the house or a wall before righting themselves and doing it all over again.....I've always assumed they were males looking for a mate since that is pretty much the way men always behave under those circumstances.

Oh,don't forget the lizards that come flipping around door and window frames to keep things interesting.

I equate Italy with summer camp...never know what might be sharing the living space with you, but one heck of a lot of fun (and the source for stories for all the years of your life).
 
Posts: 1419 | Location: Northern Virginia | Registered: 22 May 2006Report This Post

Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
quote:
equate Italy with summer camp...never know what might be sharing the living space with you, but one heck of a lot of fun (and the source for stories for all the years of your life).

Sounds like it is good that I go to Italy in the winter and early spring. Ostia is supposed to have scorpions also. Guidebooks warn you about them. Since the lastest I have been in Italy is the first week in April, I guess that the scorpions are still asleep or moving slowly.
 
Posts: 5404 | Location: St Paul, MN | Registered: 10 February 2006Report This Post
Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
There were plenty of mosquitos in Venice in October. We found the plug-ins (easy to find at the hardware store) to be the most effective; mild to no smell, longer lasting, and seemed to keep the critters out when the doors were open.
 
Posts: 498 | Location: Boulder, CO | Registered: 22 May 2002Report This Post
Slow Traveler
Picture of SandraK
posted Hide Post
Late in Sept last year, walking around Venice in the middle of the day, I got a bite in the corner of my left eye lid. My eye swelled completley shut.!! Just lovely for those last few pictures of my first trip to Italy. And I began the trip, at the first of the month in Tuscany, by the 3rd day, covered with bites on both arms and legs, even using bug spray, and repellant. They love me too. Now how special is that.!! Complain

Sandra


Memories of Italy Photo Album
A Sentimental Journey Italy, 2006 Trip Report
 
Posts: 412 | Location: Redmond, Washington | Registered: 21 July 2006Report This Post
Slow Traveler
Picture of kurberry
posted Hide Post
I'd assume they will be a problem and prepare accordingly. We had such a mild winter that they never died off and we've had them all year long including over the winter. Personally, a skeeter in my ear will wake me to frantic in milliseconds. I use the plug-in every night to avoid rude awakenings. We live in a well-watered area: lots of rivers around. I did notice that August was pretty bug-free around here this year since everything's been so abnormally dry, but assume the worst for April!

We had giant centipedes last week in Umbria (large enough for saddles) and two scorpions as well. Look for my (scathing) review of the accommodation in the appropriate section later in the week....


TUSCIA, proudly never the next Tuscany!
 
Posts: 162 | Location: Civita Castellana (VT) | Registered: 13 February 2004Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Madonna del Piatto
posted Hide Post
I am just wondering if one has more time to look at bugs when one is on holiday or in a strange environment.

When I lived in Texas, where they sprayed and disinfected all the time and had screens all over, we had the most absurd number of cockroaches in the house. So many that me, an entomologist, was afraid to step in the kitchen at night. I just cannot stand their silly noise. And they were really big, we do not have any bug that is so large here.

But then, unless one is seriously allergic, what's the sense to be afraid of a bug? It is a small animal that is infinitely smaller and weaker than us.

And by the way bugs, like all other animals are part of the countryside. It is just impossible to expect to go anywhere and not to find any.

Urban life might bring some to believe that it is possible to live in a "cleaned up" environment where only what's pretty and accepted is allowed to survive, but that's a fantasy or the temporary effect of some poison. Nature is stronger than us.
 
Posts: 2294 | Location: Assisi, Umbria, Italy | Registered: 18 February 2004Report This Post

Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
quote:
Urban life might bring some to believe that it is possible to live in a "cleaned up" environment where only what's pretty and accepted is allowed to survive, but that's a fantasy or the temporary effect of some poison. Nature is stronger than us


There is nothing natural about city life. Man, I am glad I live in a place where it is cold enough so the bugs die before they get to be very big. Nature is stronger than us, and we all eventually end up in a pine box 6 feet under. But until then, I want to like in my unnatural environments with as few bugs as possible. My feline companions through the years have been great at eliminating all the larger bugs and rodents (they are not very good at mosquitoes though).
 
Posts: 5404 | Location: St Paul, MN | Registered: 10 February 2006Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Diana Strinati Baur
posted Hide Post
quote:
My favorite Italian insect is the huge beetle that flies around dumbly until they crash into the side of the house or a wall before righting themselves and doing it all over again.....I've always assumed they were males looking for a mate since that is pretty much the way men always behave under those circumstances.


Now, that's funny.

They are called cimeci (or cimaci, I don't know how to spell it and can't find my lexicon right now), I believe, at least that is what they are called in these here hills.

I believe they might be known as stink bugs also? If you step on them, they smell.

I have, out of necessity, become a fan of bugs, simply because, as Letizia states, nature is stronger than us.

There are the spiders, whih left to their own devices, form a cocoon ( I thought only catipilars made those) in the corners of your doors and windows, reproduce hundreds of themselves, and disperse into the rest of the house...

The millipedes, Lord help me, they look like bugs caught in the 60s, they are so hairy looking, but those are legs, not hairs...

The spider that looks like it's only a black dot until you disturb it and it unwraps itself into the size of a coffee cup saucer....

The male-mating-low-flying-loud-crash-landing cimeci's that Alpinista lovingly refers to (they eat tomatoes to, they ADORE tomatoes, in fact).

The calibroni, or hornets, the two inch long variety....which actually scare the living bejezes out of me ever since I found a nest of them in my fireplace chimney and thousands crowded around the front light of my home (don't worry, future guests, we have become quite savvy at gunning them down before they flock, out of self-preservation alone)..

I do my best to keep them out of the house, but you know, they are like used car salesmen. I kick 'em out the front door, they file in the back door.

E' cosi.
 
Posts: 3999 | Registered: 30 July 2005Report This Post

Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
quote:
I do my best to keep them out of the house, but you know, they are like used car salesmen. I kick 'em out the front door, they file in the back door.

We had some beetles like this in central Illinois. They were seasonal in August. My first feline companion posted herself at the door to our apartment. The screen kept them from coming in the windows. They came in by crawling under the door. as they would crawl in, my cat would hit them and eat them one by one. We could hear all the crunching noises they made when she chewed on them. One of my current feline companions can catch flies out of the air.
 
Posts: 5404 | Location: St Paul, MN | Registered: 10 February 2006Report This Post


Slow Traveler
Picture of Alpinista
posted Hide Post
As long as we are on the topic of bugs that we like more than mosquitos....or is it mosquitoes? Having a former vice-presidential moment here...

The village where we have our home has a midsummer's dinner with tables set up at the school's soccer field. The first year we were there, we watched in horror as a dense cloud of winged insects filled the air up by the lights above the field and then slowly descended en masse towards us. No one else seemed to mind (although I did notice that the villagers did have enough sense to clean their plates before the cloud descended....something we had been too busy talking to get done).

To make things more interesting, the eaves of all the houses started disgorging bats by the score who took care of many, but far from all, of the insects.

Eventually, the bats were full; the remaining insects settled to the ground (where they were dispatched by all the dancing Italians...some day we'll talk more about how the Italians love to show off their dancing skills), and life went on. We learned to eat first and talk second for all the subsequent years.
 
Posts: 1419 | Location: Northern Virginia | Registered: 22 May 2006Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Madonna del Piatto
posted Hide Post
quote:
They are called cimeci (or cimaci, I don't know how to spell it and can't find my lexicon right now), I believe, at least that is what they are called in these here hills.


Cimice (cimici plural), green southern stink bug, Nezara virdula. My Ph.D subject. They are major worldiwide pests of soybean, but yes they eat many vegetables if beans are not there.

As far as I know they are of no harm to people. Most stink bugs are of agricultural interest only. They have a stink gland and when disturbed they release the odor as a form of defense. We have a lovely art deco lamp in our living room and during the fall we often get one plaiyng rowboat in the lamp. Stupid dumb bugs.
 
Posts: 2294 | Location: Assisi, Umbria, Italy | Registered: 18 February 2004Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Diana Strinati Baur
posted Hide Post
You are a star, Letizia. I am amazed what resources and knowledge a person can find here.

I find our little friends crawling in the funnies places all fall and early winter. I can't even say I dislike them, they always make me laugh. I can't imagine they would ever hurt anyone. But they are a pain in the garden.

Ok, Letitzia, now I have another one for you. Farfalline? They are little tiny moths which line up in a row on our fruit trees. Before they develop, they are a little white thing, like an albino, which jumps when you touch them. They annoy me because they stick to me when I try to remove them from trees. They don't appear too do TOO much harm, but I can't believe they are doing much good. Our neighbors are beekeepers, and one of their honeys, called melata, is made from honey carried by bees who have eaten the, well, the waste product of these moths. The melata is fantastic, tastes like molasses. Everyone here says the farfalline come from the United States (they say that about the potato bugs too) but I have never seen anything like these millions of baby moths in America.

Can you shed some light on these, or are they a Piemontese problem?

Oh, Letezia, I have a long list of bug related questions for you.... Happy
 
Posts: 3999 | Registered: 30 July 2005Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Madonna del Piatto
posted Hide Post
Ahh, Diana, my entomology knowledge is slowly fading away but I'll do my best.
A picture would greatly help but I think you are talking about whiteflies .
Whiteflies are actually a big agricultural pest and I have seen millions of them in South US. They tend to explode when too many insecticide treatments have been administered to a crop.
Everything gets killed but they have a surprising capability to develop resistance to poison so they multiply happily destroyng all the crops. A classical example of the human short sited way to mistreat nature, causing more and bigger disasters than those that needed to be fixed.

However if you have few whiteflies on your fruits, do not worry too much, as long as you have low numbers you will only contribute to feed the bees with their honeydew.
 
Posts: 2294 | Location: Assisi, Umbria, Italy | Registered: 18 February 2004Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Diana Strinati Baur
posted Hide Post
These are different, Letizia. I will try to take some pictures if I can still find them, if not, I will take some in the spring! Smile
 
Posts: 3999 | Registered: 30 July 2005Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Madonna del Piatto
posted Hide Post
If they produce honeydew, they must be some sort of homopterans, I had discarded aphids because of the color.
Real moths do not produce honeydew, they hardly feed as adults.
 
Posts: 2294 | Location: Assisi, Umbria, Italy | Registered: 18 February 2004Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Judith in Umbria
posted Hide Post
This just in from the mosquito front. They are in Florence. We had an apartment in le Cure, near a tiny river filled with ducks, pigeons and one egret. When the weather turned humid, out came the skeeters. Not just the hummers you can hide from but something tiny you couldn't hear, see or feel. They bit me around my eyes where the skin is thinnest and left durable red welts that don't itch, and underlying reddish bruising.
There went my record breaking no mosquito year.
 
Posts: 2864 | Location: Umbria | Registered: 13 September 2001Report This Post

Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Madonna del Piatto:
quote:
They are called cimeci (or cimaci, I don't know how to spell it and can't find my lexicon right now), I believe, at least that is what they are called in these here hills.


They are so common and so funny that we started to give them names.

Every now and then my son will call me" MOOOOM there is Norberto and his family here!!!"
So I would go and catch them gently -they do not stink if you do not squeeze them- and trow them out the window.

They are truly harmless.

Same I do with spiders and so forth -scorpions included.

Catch them and throw them out the door.

Scorpions and spiders: I put a glass on them, to block them in, then I slip a pieceof paper under, so they can be removed.

Other animals I just sweep them off.

Again, the idea of visiting Italian countryside and do not find any bug/critter is more plausible if you go to a theme park than the real thing.

We have bugs, it is part of the deal, nothing to be worried about. Good repellent -available everywhere, and a smile...at least it is an Italian bug.

PS Scorpions are not poisonous.


www.il-girasole.com

"Your mind not only wanders, it sometime leaves completely..."
 
Posts: 2471 | Location: Cortona, Tuscany, Italia | Registered: 29 October 2002Report This Post


Slow Traveler
Picture of Vico Girl
posted Hide Post
I hate bugs and now have screens on all the windows and even balcony door in the house in Tuscany. I have never seen so many spiders as I do in my house.One morning I went to brush my teeth and a spider had a web going from my toothbrush to the bidet faucet! The scorpions don't bother me as much as we only see an occasional one, mosquitos not too many this summer BUT>>>we had a bug that was 2 to 3 inches in lenght and 1 inch or more in width that flew and then threw itself onto a table or the ground. The villagers call it cavaocchi. I was so freaked out by it for fear it would get caught in my hair. That did happen to my cousin. It took 2 hrs to get it out of her long hair! This bug looks like a flying rhinoceros, very prehistoric looking. Is there a real name for this thing?
 
Posts: 1109 | Location: The Space Coast of Florida | Registered: 27 January 2006Report This Post

Slow Traveler
Picture of Madonna del Piatto
posted Hide Post
 
Posts: 2294 | Location: Assisi, Umbria, Italy | Registered: 18 February 2004Report This Post

Moderator

Slow Traveler
Picture of Roz
posted Hide Post
Just thought I would top this thread, since I don't believe anyone has mentioned the recent article in the NY Times: As Earth Warms Up, Tropical Virus Moves to Italy. It's about the tiger mosquito, which has moved into Castiglione di Cervia, near Ravenna, carrying a deadly virus that has killed or seriously debilitated quite a few people.

- Roz
 
Posts: 9062 | Location: Napa, CA | Registered: 01 August 2004Report This Post

Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
quote:
As Earth Warms Up, Tropical Virus Moves to Italy. It's about the tiger mosquito, which has moved into Castiglione di Cervia, near Ravenna, carrying a deadly virus that has killed or seriously debilitated quite a few people.


This article is one of the best reasons I can see for screens on the windows. It's not a case of oh, Italians don't have mosquitoes, if so many people obviously got bitten and sick. Ravenna is in the North, so something like this would easily spread down the boot of Italy like malaria did in the early centuries AD.
 
Posts: 5404 | Location: St Paul, MN | Registered: 10 February 2006Report This Post


Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
One reason for the variation in mosquito populations is that some places have more standing water than others. Depending on whether the still water is treated or not, mosquitoes blossom.

I wonder to what degree the Italian government (local or national) takes mosquito prevention seriously. Where I grew up in California, it's a big deal for the government to drain still bodies of water. Lot of public awareness programs as well, teaching residents to empty flower pots or other containers where mosquitoes could plant eggs. Does Bologna, for example, do anything to drain the canal that runs through it? No, and I wonder if they treat it either. Bologna is hellish for mosquitoes, while Rome seems free of them. The variation in population levels leads me to think that different municipalities treat the problem differently.


-----------------------------------
Blog o' travels
 
Posts: 1925 | Location: Madrid, Spain | Registered: 26 November 2002Report This Post

Slow Traveler
posted Hide Post
quote:
Where I grew up in California, it's a big deal for the government to drain still bodies of water. Lot of public awareness programs as well, teaching residents to empty flower pots or other containers where mosquitoes could plant eggs. Does Bologna, for example, do anything to drain the canal that runs through it?


In MN the state and counties have mosquito control programs. They spray and drop these pellets into swamps (by helicoptors and by hand) to keep mosquitoes from breeding in the water. They don't drain the swamps (ie 'wetlands") because a lot of wildlife lives there, and the wetlands serve as a buffer to prevent erosion of the land.

So you don't have to drain the ponds and canals to keep the mosquito levels down, but you do have to do something.
 
Posts: 5404 | Location: St Paul, MN | Registered: 10 February 2006Report This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2  

Closed Topic Closed

    Slow Travel Talk  Hop To Forum Categories  TRAVEL  Hop To Forums  Italy    Mosquitoes in Italy

© SlowTrav.com 2000 - 2014
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

Italy Information

Slow Travel by Country


Follow SlowTrav on Twitter

SlowTrav on Facebook

Click to book a rental car in Europe

Amazon.com - books, etc.

EBags

Slow Travel Affiliates

Slow Travel Community

Recent Blog Posts

World Travel